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Give space back to the sea. Cultivate new life in a watery urban basin.
Traditional development comes at the expense of the sea: nature is typically erased to make room for people + cities. We recognize opportunities for people + water, cities + nature to co-exist—to live with + in relationship to one another in ways that are socially rich, environmentally resilient, + economically beneficial.

FORTIFY with living levees
By carving a water basin at the center of the site, we create a place for rising tides. New development at its edges is fortified with multipurpose, living levees—flood infrastructure rendered as new public realm, with promenades, elevated lawns, plazas, terraces. New buildings bring social + urban presence to the basin edge, along with economic opportunity. The levee, too, protects critical assets in the nearby Seaport + at Gillette.

ABSORB + ACCOMMODATE water
Pockets + bends in the living levees allow for wetlands + aquaculture farms—places that teem with wildlife + act as sponges during high tides + storms. Within the basin, new residential development + public spaces float on water, rising + falling to tidal/lunar cycles, + to storm events. These are made public via elevated walkways, gangways + ramps, docks for kayaks + small boats, + new floating open spaces. Pools, skating rinks, wetland gardens, plazas, farmer’s markets, + play spaces occupy the basin + connect its various shores—celebrating a renewed city life + its watery origins.

ADAPT to new conditions
In areas with existing development, multi-level walkways offer new experiences of the city, connecting existing neighborhoods to floating buildings + open spaces + providing safe retreats during extreme storm events. Existing buildings can be adapted by changing air right zoning codes + allowing multi-level development up top; thus we preserve historic buildings; move critical building infrastructure out of the flood; increase FAR in exchange for resilient upgrades to the ground floors; and adapt loading docks as energy producing turbine converters to harvest the current of the rising tide.

Together, these strategies create social + ecological assets out of living flood infrastructure. They tune new development to the cycles of the sea. They provide existing owners models for retro-fitting + developing assets in ways that add social, cultural, environmental + economic value. Living in water. Living near water. Living with water.

Company Name
Perkins+Will

Team Member(s)
PERKINS+WILL – (ARCHITECTURE)
ARLEN STAWASZ – PROJECT COORDINATOR – SEA LEVEL RISE TRAVEL RESEARCH
KHUYEN LUONG – ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER
TUAN TRIEU – ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER
PATRICK CUNNINGHAM – SENIOR DESIGNER
DANA ANDERSON – PRINCIPAL
ROBERT BROWN – MANAGING PRINCIPAL

STOSS LANDSCAPE URBANISM – (LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN)
CHRIS REED – DESIGN DIRECTOR
DIFEI MA – LANDSCAPE DESIGNER
JARRAD NEWMAN – LANDSCAPE DESIGNER
SCOTT BISHOP – PRINCIPAL
AMY WHITESIDES – ASSOCIATE

NITSCH ENGINEERING – CORE – (CIVIL ENGINEERING + PLANNING)
NICOLE HOLMES – PROJECT ENGINEER
SCOTT TURNER – DIRECTOR OF PLANNING
KATE CHOLAKIS – GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT DESIGNER
SHAWN SMITH – SENIOR ENGINEER

BOSTON UNIVERSITY – (SUSTAINABILITY + ACADEMIC RESEARCH)
DENNIS CARLBERG – SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR

WEIDLINGER ENGINEERS – (STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING)
WAYNE SILADI – STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

CRITICAL REVIEWERS
DEBORAH RIVERS – SENIOR ASSOCIATE P+W
YANEL DE ANGEL – SENIOR ASSOCIATE P+W
ANDY BENNETTE – SENIOR ASSOCIATE P+W
RASHID ASHRAF – SENIOR ASSOCIATE P+W
TYLER HINKLEY – ASSOCIATE P+W
EDMOND KIM – ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER P+W
STEPHEN MESSINGER – ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER P+W
KATHERINE SCHNIEDER – ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER P+W
JEFF KEILMAN – ASSOCIATE P+W
DAVID DIMECKI – PRINCIPAL
DEREK JOHNSON – TECHNICAL DIRECTOR P+W